Podcasts

Episode 19: Heat illness

Heat illness ranges from the benign and temporary to the life-threatening. We dive into management of heat cramps, heat syncope, heat exhaustion, and heat stroke. Rule #1: Stay on scene to cool them down.

 

Podcasts

Episode 18: Trauma reports

In person and on the radio, make the most of your concise patient report.  

Podcasts

Episode 17: The monitor should stay on.

If you felt the need to put a #cardiac monitor on at any point in the patient interaction, it should stay on as you walk into the ED. #EMS #paramedic #prehospital

Podcasts

Episode 16: Airway Pearls

We dug into our QA data and the literature to bring you some pearls on #prehospital #airway management. #EMS #paramedic

Podcasts

Episode 15: Sepsis

750,000 Americans will suffer from sepsis this year. Early recognition and treatment are key. Here we go into the field recognition of sepsis and treatment priorities.

Podcasts

Stroke treatment 24 hours from onset

For patients with #stroke outside of 4.5 hr #tPA window, they may benefit from thrombectomy up to 24 hours since last seen well. Take to comprehensive stroke center and perform MRI safety screen. #EMS #paramedic

https://www.emsworld.com/news/220085/new-24-hour-window-stroke-treatment-proving-successful-some-patients

Podcasts

‪Quick and dirty estimation of weight for #pediatric #resuscitation

Quick and dirty estimation of weight for #pediatric #resuscitation:

Birth: 5kg.

Age 1: 10kg.

Age 3: 15kg.

Age 5: 20kg.

Age 7: 25kg.

Age 9: 30kg.

#PALS #APLS

Podcasts

Episode 14- Fast facts for response to bombing victims

This is a short episode on the response to and care for bombing victims for #EMS, #Firedepartement and #Police. A longer episode will follow that covers #prehospital care in detail, but this is the initial response and considerations. #packagebombmurders #austinbombings @ATCEMS @Austin_police @austinfiredepartment @TxDPS @TravisCoSheriff @CommitteeTECC @CommitteeonTCCC @NTOATEMS Find us on @iTunes and @GooglePlay and @feedburner

Podcasts

Safe evacuation distances from explosives

From the National #Counterterrorism Center, this chart gives #evacuation distances for #explosives of different sizes. Time, distance, shielding. Minimize the TIME you are in a threat zone, increase DISTANCE between you and the device, and seek SHIELDING in the form of cover from hard buildings or terrain. #packagebombmurders #austinbombings #EMS #prehospital #paramedic #firedepartment

https://www.dni.gov/files/NCTC/documents/features_documents/2006_calendar_bomb_stand_chart.pdf

Podcasts

Episode 13: Cannabis Hyperemesis Syndrome

Neither rare nor mysterious, Cannabis Hyperemesis Syndrome causes pain and vomiting that can be difficult to treat.

Marijuana use is growing for medical purposes and recreational abuse. With this has come a rise in Cannabis Hyperemesis Syndrome which is marked by recurrent, severe abdominal pain and vomiting that does not respond well to the usual antiemetics. Dr. Pickett discusses the causes and treatment of this disorder which we will recognize in increasing numbers with increased marijuana availability.

Podcasts

Critical care inter facility transport: Handling conflict with class and style

Dr. Cynthia Griffin @CMGrffn wrote this great article on #CCT and how to handle orders that conflict with protocol or practice style. Doctor’s orders and intra-transfer modifications

#EMS #paramedic #flightmedic #flightnurse

Podcasts

Episode 12: Trauma Resuscitation

Fluid resuscitation, blood, acidosis, coagulopathy, hypothermia, TXA, intubation, push dose pressors! All the greatest trauma lit for your naughty bits.

Podcasts

SVT with aberrancy, or V-tach?

Some tips to help differentiate #SVT with aberrancy and #vtach. #EMS #prehospital #paramedic

https://www.aliem.com/2013/07/supraventricular-tachycardia-svt-with-aberrancy-versus-ventricular-tachycardia-vt/

Podcasts

Pressors in shock

What’s the right pressor for different types of shock? When should you pull the trigger?

http://www.emdocs.net/evidence-based-approach-pressors-shock-part/

Podcasts

Episode 11: MRI for acute stroke- screening in the field

In this episode we sat down with Dr. Steven Warach the Director of the Clinical Research Institute and Vascular Neurologist from Dell Seton Medical Center to talk about acute MRI for stroke and how we might be able to reduce the time to treatment.

3 questions comprise the safety screen:

  1. Do you have any implanted electronics like a pacemaker or defibrillator?
  2. Do you have any vascular clips in your brain?
  3. Do you have any metal fragments in your body?
Podcasts

Episode 10: Asthma!

Most asthma is pretty routine. Most. Dr. Pickett talks about tools for management of the severe asthmatic adult or child.

 

Podcasts

Episode 9: Bedside Teaching- Medic Mindset and ATCOMD joint podcast! Teaching at the bedside in the field or in the hospital.

Some people have the natural gift of teaching. For others it does not come easily. Teaching is all about connecting with your student, finding out their abilities and weaknesses, and helping build them into stronger clinicians. Teaching is a learned skill that can be molded and honed no matter how good a teacher you are. I sat down with Ginger Locke, Associate Professor of EMS Education at Austin Community College and the producer of the Medic Mindset podcast to see what tips and tricks we can offer the field preceptor.

Basic RGB

Podcasts

ATCEMS OMD Podcast Episode 8: Atrial fibrillation!

Ever had that patient that you just weren’t sure what pathway they fit in?

You have a 75 yo F who called 911 due to palpitations and increasing shortness of breath. She looks fairly comfortable with belies the rate of 180 seen on the monitor. She does endorse some chest discomfort. No previous drug use, no recent surgery/ Rhythm might be irregular but it’s too hard to tell at that rate. Should I cardiovert? Should I give them diltiazem? Could this tachycardia be reactive to something, and I should look for other potential issues?

Podcasts

Reconstruction of the Vegas shooting

NYT reconstruction of Vegas shooting

This is a very well done reconstruction of the mass shooting in Las Vegas. Several things to note here: varying reactions in the crowd (you can see some individuals standing and staring in disbelief as others run to cover), care under fire and members of the crowd organizing others to help, and the police who charged into the gunfire to end the shooting.

Podcasts

ATCEMS OMD Podcast Episode 7: Mishmash! Dextrose, hemostatic agents, and chest seals.

Decided to address some reader comments with this one. Dextrose, hemostatic agents, chest seals. Little bit of medicine, little bit of trauma.

Why did we change over from D50 to D10 for hypoglycemia? And should we be treating hypoglycemic diabetics the same way we did 30 years ago? Should I have a hemostatic gauze in my kit? And how useful are chest seals really?

Article

The 3 different types of report in EMS

When the EMS provider has to convey patient information, there are 3 distinct settings in which this should occur. You don’t want to waste time on the phone when you (and they) need to be doing other things, and you don’t want to leave out critical details when you need an order or you are handing off care to another provider.

  1. Report to the receiving hospital to obtain a bed and mobilize any necessary resources, such as a trauma team.
    1. This report should be brief and include only enough information to mobilize the appropriate resource.Details such as what medications have been delivered need not  be given, as well as the details of how the injury occurred or an explicit history of present illness. Key thing is that this should be BRIEF. You have better things to do than talk on the phone, and so do they.
      1. In the case of a trauma, it requires a report of mechanism of injury, MAJOR injuries (can exclude most bruises, lacerations, and abrasions), vital signs, GCS, and whether or not the bleeding and airway are controlled. This is enough injury to determine what level of trauma response will be needed at the hospital (Category 1, Alpha, or whatever their terminology is) and whether blood should be brought to the trauma bay.
      2. For stroke, the current symptoms and LAST TIME KNOWN WELL are paramount to determine if the stroke team needs to be mobilized.
      3. For STEMI, EKG findings, age, and vitals are important. If the patient has a cardiologist, knowing who this is may be important if the hospital has more than one cardiology group that takes ER patients.
  2. Report to online medical control physician, usually to obtain advice or permission to execute some part of the protocol or deviate from protocol.
    1. This usually requires a more detailed report to paint the picture. Make sure you know who you are talking to before you launch into this report. It won’t do for you to give a detailed report to to the person that picks up the phone only to repeat the whole thing when the physician gets on the line.
    2. Start with your BLUF (bottom line up front) and tell them what you are asking for. If you need an order for something, say so. “Doc, I need an order to repeat the ketamine dose in this patient. 45 yo M in a rollover MVC…” “Doc, I have a patient here that wants to refuse transport and I don’t think that’s in her best interest. This 65 yo F was found today…”
  3. Handoff to another provider such as another EMS provider, nurse or physician at the receiving hospital.
    1. This report should be detailed, including all treatments rendered and the patient’s response. Concerning findings or clues of the patient’s history are conveyed then.
      1. If it is a time critical situation such as a trauma, you probably have only 30-60 seconds to deliver this info. Don’t rush through it but give a concise history and summary of injuries and last vitals. Summarize any medications given especially pain medications, sedatives, or paralytics.
      2. You can always give the summary report to the resuscitation team, then fill in the details with the nurse who is the “recorder” documenting the resuscitation.
    2. For handoff to another prehospital provider, it is good practice for that provider to read back the summary report to you to make sure everything was understood.
Podcasts

ATCEMS OMD Podcast Episode 6: Flush rate oxygen, apneic oxygenation, and ramped positioning for intubation

Do you like it when your patient desaturates just as you are getting ready to intubate them? Of course not, nobody does. Here are some tricks to help keep the sat up while you secure the airway.

Article

Rescue Task Force in action at Vegas shooting

http://www.msn.com/en-us/news/us/armed-with-a-new-approach-police-and-medics-stormed-through-the-las-vegas-gunfire-saving-lives/ar-AAsXOVg?li=BBnb7Kz

Staging during large scale attacks has a real cost in terms of lives. We must balance the tiny theoretical risk to rescuers with the huge known risk to patients who are already bleeding and dying. Rescue Task Force programs are the way to mitigate the risk and stop the clock of life threatening hemorrhage. Vegas did it right.

Article

Epinephrine dosing in anaphylaxis when the patient is on a beta blocker

This is a great blog about all things emergency medicine. Great evidenced based articles. This episode they talk about epi dosing for anaphylaxis in patients on beta blockers. Academic Life in EM- Epinephrine

BLUF: Epi in patients with beta blockers does not cause seem to cause unopposed vasoconstriction and hypertensive crisis. Use standard doses of 0.3-0.5mg IM.

ETA: If the patient isn’t responding to epinephrine, give them IV Glucagon. It activates the same cGMP pathway in the cell. BUT you have to give higher doses than the 1mg you might have. 4-6mg, even 10 mg. And you can always go up on the epi dose!

Podcasts

ATCEMS OMD Podcast Episode 4: Move over, heroin. The opiate epidemic takes a devastating new turn.